The streets were no longer empty. A crowd was streaming

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LISTOMERE (Baron de), nephew of the preceding, born in 1791; was in turn lieutenant and captain in the navy. During a leave of absence spent with his aunt at Tours he began to intervene in favor of the persecuted abbe, Francois Birotteau, but finally opposed him upon learning of the power of the Congregation, and that the priest's name figured in the Baronne de Listomere's will. [The Vicar of Tours.]

The streets were no longer empty. A crowd was streaming

LISTOMERE (Comtesse de), old, lived in Saint-Germain suburbs of Paris, in 1839. At the Austrian embassy she became acquainted with Rastignac, Madame de Nucingen, Ferdinand du Tillet and Maxime de Trailles. [The Member for Arcis.]

The streets were no longer empty. A crowd was streaming

LISTOMERE-LANDON (Marquise de), born in Provence, 1744; lady of the eighteenth century aristocracy, had been the friend of Duclos and Marechal de Richelieu. Later she lived in the city of Tours, where she tried to help by unbiased counsel her unsophisticated niece by marriage, the Marquise Victor d'Aiglemont. Gout and her happiness over the return of the Duc d'Angouleme caused Madame de Listomere's death in 1814. [A Woman of Thirty.]

The streets were no longer empty. A crowd was streaming

LOLOTTE. (See Topinard, Madame.)

LONGUEVILLE (De), noble and illustrious family, whose last scion, the Duc de Rostein-Limbourg, executed in 1793, belonged to the younger branch. [The Ball at Sceaux.]

LONGUEVILLE, deputy under Charles X., son of an attorney, without authority placed the particle /de/ before his name. M. Longueville was connected with the house of Palma, Werbrust & Co.; he was the father of Auguste, Maximilien and Clara; desired a peerage for himself and a minister's daughter for his elder son, who had an income of fifty thousand francs. [The Ball at Sceaux.]

LONGUEVILLE (Auguste), son of the preceding, born late in the eighteenth century, possessed an income of fifty thousand francs; married, probably a minister's daughter; was secretary of an embassy; met Madame Emilie de Vandenesse during a vacation which he was spending in Paris, and told her the secret of his family. Died young, while employed in the Russian embassy. [The Ball at Sceaux.]

LONGUEVILLE (Maximilien), one of Longueville's three children, sacrificed himself for his brother and sister; entered business, lived on rue du Sentier--then no longer called rue du Groschenet; was employed in a large linen establishment, situated near rue de la Paix; fell passionately in love with Emilie de Fontaine, who became Madame Charles de Vandenesse. She ceased to reciprocate his passion upon learning that he was merely a novelty clerk. However, M. Longueville, as a result of the early death of his father and of his brother, became a banker, a member of the nobility, a peer, and finally the Vicomte "Guiraudin de Longueville." [The Ball at Sceaux.]